Patmos to Kasos Ferry

The Patmos Kasos ferry route connects Dodecanese Islands with Dodecanese Islands. Currently there is just the 1 ferry company operating this ferry service, Blue Star Ferries. The crossing operates up to 1 times each week with sailing durations from around 14 hours 25 minutes.

Patmos Kasos sailing durations and frequency may vary from season to season so we’d advise doing a live check to get the most up to date information.

Patmos - Kasos Ferry Operators

  • Blue Star Ferries
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 14 hr 25 min
    • Get price

Patmos Guide

Located in the Aegean Sea, the Greek island of Patmos is part of the Dodecanese group of islands. It is one of the most northerly islands in the Dodecanese and lies just off the west coast of Turkey. Patmos' capital is the town of Chora and its port is in the town of Skala. The island, which is also known as the "island of the Apocalypse" is popular with tourists from around the world. However, there is more to the island than this. It is a pretty island with traditional whitewashed houses, crystal clear waters, excellent food and a thriving nightlife.

The Cave of the Apocalypse, a major visitor attraction, is reputedly to have been the cave where Saint Ioannis heard the voice of God and wrote the Apocalypse. In the cave, visitors can see the cross engraved by Saint Ioannis along with three small cracks on the rock through which the voice of God came, symbolising the Holy Trinity.

Patmos is connected by ferry to Piraeus, the other islands of the Dodecanese, and also with other islands of the Aegean Sea, like Samos and Ikaria. The ferry from Piraeus takes about 7 hours to reach the port of Patmos. The journey to the nearby islands of the Dodecanese take about 1-1.5 hours, while the trips from Ikaria or Samos take a little longer.

Kasos Guide

The Greek island of Kasos is the most southerly of the Dodecanese group of islands and has a history that is closely associated with the nearby island of Crete. The island's first inhabitants are thought to have been the Phoenicians, while Homer included the island as one of the islands that participated in the Trojan War. The small island had a significant naval presence and used its fleet to take part in the Revolution in 1821 which unfortunately resulted in its complete destruction by the Turks in 1824.

The island's more recent history is linked to the rest of the islands in the Dodecanese until they were all unified with Greece in 1948. Many of island's residents, and those of Karpathos, emigrated to America and Egypt, where they worked on the construction of the Suez Canal in the middle of the 19th century.

Kasos can be reached by ferry from Piraeus, Crete (Siteia, Aghios Nikolaos), Rhodes, Halki and Karpathos.